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in the murdoch scandal. this time the number two man in scotland yard. one day after number one man went belly up. and easy to follow flow chart tonight of the tangled relationships between and among murdoch's people and the police and will ask, is it happening here in america as well? if you've never heard that michele bachmann referred to homosexuality at bondage, despair and enslavement, gay rights groups have and are making sure will you. tonight, anything you say, or certainly anything michele bachmann says, will be used against you in the court of public opinion. let me finish tonight with a great moment for america. even if defeat at the world cup. we start with the republicans as a protest party. david korn and an msnbc political analyst and pat buchanan, a political analyst as well for msnbc. i was watching you on "morning joe." working both ends ever the block. 12 hours after you began your day. never seen a republican democrat party, we have is a position, take it or leave it. we're not dealing at all with you. what do you think of the party platform now. >>> the republican party, the
. tonight, scotland yard's lead investigator says there may be as many as 4,000 victims in the case against rupert murdoch's media empire and among them, former prime minister gordon brown who says his family's privacy was violated by a story that hit very close to home. stephanie gosk has the report from london. >> reporter: the british public wants answers. rupert murdoch and top executive, rebecca brooks have all been asked to testify next week before a parliament committee. the powerful trio have yet to agree but "news international" the subsidiary that ran "the news of the world" is already defending itself against the latest allegations. in an interview on the bbc today, former prime minister, gordon brown, accused "news international" of employing known criminals to dig up personal information. >> i'm shocked. i'm genuinely shocked to find this happened because of the links with criminals. >> reporter: in 2006, a murdoch paper run at the time by rebecca brooks reported that brown's newborn son has cystic fibrosis. now brown questions the methods the paper used to get that information
" reporters used scotland yard police officials to ping people they were following or were interested in. that means they used actual cell phone towers to locate some of the celebrities or politicians that they wanted to follow. these are incredibly incriminating allegations that just go to show how wide the scope of this is, and how high up it goes within scotland yard and you mentioned today that the scotland yard investigators were in a hearing in parliament today facing tough questions from the members of parliament over their accusations that they turned a blind eye to what "news of the world" was doing and police officers were accepting payments of bits of information and on top of that you have prime minister gordon brown in an emotional interview with the bbc expressing his anger in the tactics of the newspapers owned by rupert murdoch were engaged in criminal activities and hired known criminals to get very personal information from him. >> and also, you have got -- this story is more incredible by the moment, but the former pop star and still is, stephanie, george michael went
minister say whether this inquiry does extend to scotland? does include the issues such as policing which has devolved in scotland and the scotland's first minister for that and in that context has he secured an assurance from an uncharacteristic required first minister about his contact with news international? >> i can confirm this inquiry does extend to scotland. as i said we did send the draft terms of reference to get the administrations. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with, which concerned the information commissioners' report which we haven't put specifically into the terms but, of course, it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it's such an important part of the work. more generally speaking, when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> lee scott. >> does my right honorable friend agree with that welfare allegations in the metropolitan police have a vast majority of hundreds of police officers are protecting us
suggests that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers conducted a murder investigation providing you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with the pursuit of justice. he mentioned alex marancak, and a member of the metropolitan police. can you tell us more about that meet stph-g. >> i can tell you something about it, but i was asked to recall a meeting that i'd had at scotland yard in 2002, and i had -- i was asked recently i think by channel 4 if that story was referring to my information. and my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject. and so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november that i had, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting in very early january. it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollection of the meeting. but on the other hand because of the sarah's law campaign i did have some pretty
, and that company is involved with bribing foreign officials, that being detectives at scotland yard, it's a violation of that act. we most frequently see that act being prosecuted with companies opening up plants or supply lines in third world countries and the brother of a prince or son-in-law of a queen gets a contract, basically a bribe, something that's prosecuted here mostly with large corporations doing things like that, but the facts do fit for news corp., if they bribed people at scotland yard to prosecute them in the u.s. >> how serious is the violation of a foreign practices act, something the sort of thing that could have more problems for a company? >> could have more problems, people could go to jail depending on how high you can show there was authorization to violate the act, but the corporation could be put into a monitorship for a period of time as we've seen with wall street companies over the years. they could actually make the company -- have the company lose its charter if they wanted to, but i'd like to move away from the criminal for a second, our federal communic
to scotland, too? does include the issues such as policing that have evolved in scotland? >> it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information commissioner's report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations against some offices and the metropolitan police. protecting us and doing a wonderful job and should not be smeared by this? >> that's an incredibly important point police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. and while, of course, we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong in the met, we shouldn't allow that to undermine the public confidence the people have in the bobby on the beat and the fantastic job they do for us. >> mr. richard burton. >> in response from the question from my right honorable friend, the prime minister said if he
challenge question was a, operation weeting, the code name for scotland yard's hacking investigation. scotland yard has a book called "the book," and operations are randomly assigned code names from the book. go to our website for more. thanks for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> the headline-grabbing word scandal no longer captures what's happening to rupert murdoch's empire. targets as high as the prime minister and the queen and with one of his top lieutenants arrested in london today, this is a moment of reckoning for journalism. is there really any evidence of misconduct here in the u.s.? are murdoch's critics using this crisis as an excuse to vilify him. our guests include the editor of "the guardian." how much is the press being spun by the president and the republicans. i'm howard kurtz. this is "reliable sources." >>> the murdoch media empire is in all-out damage control mode as the scandal at the british papers continues to spread on this side of the atlantic, the fbi opened a preliminary investigation on whether phone hacking
that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers provided you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with justice. he particularly mentions the name of another senior executive and at the meeting a man from metropolitan police, that "news of the world" were guilty of interference and attempt to credit -- discredit a police officer and his wife. can you tell us more about that meeting? >> well, i can tell you something about it but it's -- i was asked to recall a meeting that i had at scotland yard in 2002. i was asked recently, i think by channel 4, about the story you're referring to. my information -- my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november but that's what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting and in very early january, so it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollectio
at scotland yard, who were part of the original investigation into "news of the world" were themselves victims of hacking. the allegations raising new questions about their handling of the case, and whether or not they feared reprisals from the paper. those officers will appear at a hearing on that today. >>> and that's expected that the tabloid controversy is weighing heavily on shares of news corp. publisher of the sunday "times" and the now-shuttered "news of the world. "let's get all up in your business this morning. cnbc's lisa bojesen is live in london. >> you mentioned the pressure on news corp. shares we saw them closing lower by something like 7.5%. this morning continued pressure on b sky b shares with the stock down by as much as 5% early on. we saw late yesterday that murdoch made the bid, the potential bid that he's trying to push through for b sky b. a little more political, by putting it into the hands of the politicians here who in turn are putting it forward to a longer-term commission hearing that will take place or investigation taking place into whether or not the competiti
volume of information that was extremely useful to scotland yard and in return mr. philbeck received information from the police computer -- >> well, i don't know about that, and most journalists who work as a crime editor or a crime correspondents have a working relationship with that their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010, was when you were chief executive of "news international" and there was certain things where obviously we, a reporter we have found that the evidence from the people of "news international" was wholly unsatisfactory and the amnesia and inconceivable that clyde was a rogue reporter as have been passed on to us, and that we referred to the neville e-mail in there, and awe -- all of that kind of stuff, and when you were chief executive of "news international" at the time that the report was published, did you read the report? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every single word of it, but i read a large majority of it and i particularly read the criticisms addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence t
. the avoidance of any doubt, upon the prime minister state whether this does extend to scotland to? does include the issues such as policing that have involved in -- involved in scotland? has the security -- about his contacts with his international? >> it does end -- it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information -- information commissioners' report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry cut it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations between -- against some offices and the metropolitan police. >> police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong, we should not allow that to undermine the public confidence that people have and the fantastic job they do. >> the prime minister said he was given credible information regarding andy coulson, he would have
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >> i am sending good luck to all the southern sudanese. >> woodruff: but the jubilation in the streets of
were bought and sold. scotland yard claims that people were trying to wreck the current inquiry by leaking allegations the news of the world tried to get some numbers to members of the royal family by blaming police officers. -- bribing police officers. >> once again the ethics that should underpin the relationship between the police and journalists is under scrutiny. police the publicity to help them investigate. but a slew of allegations shows the darker side. >> any journalist trying to persuade police officers to impart sensitive information. that is what the stories are all about. there is a line that cannot be crossed. a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information and exchange for cash. another profound shock. personal protection officers travel and the same cars as the royals. others are in back of the vehicles. here in the silver van. others guard buildings. the bbc was told that "news of editor was asked for a thousand pounds to be paid to a royal protection officer. the police officer had stolen a confidential directory containing phone num
-ranking officers of scotland yard part of the original investigation in to news of the world were themselves victims of hacking. the allegations raising new questions about their handling of the case and they feared reprisals from the paper. the officers will appear at a hearing on that today. >>> wow. so have we heard -- have we heard any response from murdock's people? about these are overblown, they're not true? because you know what, again we've seen before where things are swept up. >> absolutely. especially in london. >> it's a storm, the london tabloids. and you sit there and go, i wonder if this is much to do about nothing down the road. but for the fact that i'm not really hearing a response from news corp. they're usually the most aggressive pitbulls. i mean, i always -- you look at their pr staff, they're remarkable. you sit there in wonderment. but they're completely silent. i'm thinking, wow, where there's smoke, there might be a lot of fire. >> they responded this morning to great britain. they responded by obviously the closure of the -- >> yeah, obviously. >> they responded.
you something about it. i was asked to recall the meeting at scotland yard in 2002. i was off recently by channel 4 about the story. my information, my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection is the meeting was on a completely different subject. i am only going on what i was told by channel 4. the meeting in november, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible. no meeting in november. but subsequently, very early january it may be that meeting was not my recollection of the meeting. on the other hand, i did have some regular meetings. >> rupert murdoch said he relied on lieutenants that he trusted. who would you trust? >> the news room at any newspaper is trust. if you think about -- i am sure paul farrelly would agree. think about way a story gets published it depends on trust. you rely on people that work for you to behave in a proper manner and you rely on the information you are given at the time. that is why i am with the committee today about the interception of milly dowler's voicemail not commenting on what other people knew
people have been arrested but it may not end there. scotland yard believes the investigation will continue to grow and along with it the pressure on rupert murdoch's media empire. >> that was stephanie gosk. >> the real story there and willie touched on it, hugh grant has looked the same for 20 years. before knotting hill -- >> doesn't get work done. >> there was -- he did "about a boy", i like that one but he got old there then he got young again. i don't know how that happens. he's looking good. isn't that the story, the best analysis you've heard this morning. >> i would like to follow up with simon. >> you know who else hasn't aged? >> who? >> i remember watching him and it was in '63, the beatles still a year away but simon hobbs known as the ed sullivan of great britain, he hasn't aged a year. >> it's extraordinary, it's in the british genes. good morning. you know the germans have a word, it's called -- >> what are you upset about today? >> the germans have a word it's taking place here at other people's misfortune. in business terms, you know, you cut through really w
's a reality, isn't it? it's reality, if you look at it. they figured out how to wire scotland yard and parliament and 10 downing street. rupert murdock has been for some time, the most powerful man in britain. >> when you see this frail man yesterday objectly incapable of following the facts, unable to remember the names and certain facts, well, i'm afraid there was something on the part of journalists. they know him to be aggressive, particular, specific. remember, i was mentioning earlier in piers morgan's diaries, he worked for rupert murdock for 18 months and he rang him every week of every month for 18 months. >> martin -- >> yes he says he knew nothing. >> are you surprised more questions haven't been raised about the passage from peer morgan's book where he talks about phone hacking and brags about how you can do it? >> no, i'm not surprised. he doesn't say he does it. what he says in the book, if you read it carefully, this is important. he said, he heard about this phenomena and he therefore personally changed his own cell phone numbers in order to prevent that from happen
a substantial volume of information to the scotland yard, and in return, he received dozens of items of confidential and for action from the police and that is the obligation. >> most journalists who work for the crime editor or half a working relationship and their particular police force. >> when our report was published in early 2010 was when you were chief executive of news international, and there were certain things we're obviously we found that the evidence from the people from the news international was unsatisfactory and collecting in nisha we refer to in the reports and we felt it was inconceivable that he was a reporter as passed on to that we refer to the e-mail and all that kind of stuff. when you were the chief executive of news international at the time that report was published did you read the report we published? >> yes, i did. i'm not saying i read every word but a large majority. i read the criticisms that were addressed to the company, and i can only hope that from the evidence that you heard from us today that we have really stepped up our investigation and that
were bought and sold. scotland yard got testy today claiming people were trying to leak allegations that the "news of the world" tried to get phone numbers to members of the royal family by bribing police officer. richard watson now from the police. >> once again the ethics which should underpin the relationship between police and journalists is under scrutiny. as never before. when it works, cops need publicity to help them investigate. but a sort of allegations in recent days shows the darker side. >> any journalist work is sold -- sensitive information. that's what excludes them. but clearly there is a line that can't be crossed, and today's news as a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information for return for cash to come is yet another profound shock. >> personal protection officers travel in the same car as the royals. close protection officers in backup vehicles. others guard buildings. the bbc was told today that the notion of the "news of the world" former royal editor asked his editor who went on to work for the p.m. for 1000 pounds to be paid t
it used to obtain gordon brown's sons medical records. even so, scotland yard is investigating all of the accusations and is casting a wide net. pop singer george michael says he's being called in for questioning after a number of tweets he posted about rebecca brooks me said in one of them that she told him that almost all of their information comes directly from police. in a later tweet he said that police received, quote, a nice little wad of cash for the service. ann? >> this story just keeps on growing. thank you so much. >>> 7:09. here's matt. >> ann, thanks very much. now to washington and the heat that president obama and congressional leaders are under to reach a deal on slashing the budget deficit. nbc's kristen welker is at the white house with the latest on this. good morning. good to see you. >> good morning. good to see you, too. president obama will meet with congressional leaders again today. the two sides still very much deadlocked. and the clock is ticking. >> thank you very much. >> reporter: with the deadline looming, president obama and congressional leaders me
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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